How Everyday Offset Works

We make offsetting carbon easy and affordable by working with businesses that people use as part of their day-to-day activity. Whether it be internet shopping, taking journeys – long or short – sending parcels or eating out, we make it easy to Offset….Everyday!
But how does your decision to offset lead to savings in carbon?

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Partners

We work with partners to calculate the average distances and fuel usage for activities that their customers use, such as deliveries or journeys. We create an Everyday Offset price our partner’s activity. Partners then send us direct feeds from their systems, telling us how many of their customers have chosen to “Offset now” and how often. Every month we calculate how much Everyday Offset has been used by our various partners. We then purchase the same amount of carbon in the form of certificates or credits from the accredited projects that we sponsor.

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Carbon buying

The carbon that we use to offset customer everyday activity is generated by investing in projects globally that save or reduce carbon emissions. The projects could be generating renewable energy, improving energy efficiency or converting waste to energy and create internationally recognised “Carbon Credits” in units of tonnes of Carbon. These projects are monitored to ensure that they comply with the strict standards by one of the leading Carbon Scheme standards: UNFCCC, Gold Standard or VCS.

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Carbon Offsetting

We work with the most reputable and established offsetting company in the UK, Natural Capital Partners. They vet and monitor our carbon projects we have together, ensuring they meet the stringent levels of accreditation we adhere to.

Carbon credits

“Carbon Credits” are part of an international collaboration to mitigate the growth and concentration of greenhouse gases. One carbon credit is a certificate that represents the equivalent of one metric tonne of carbon dioxide or similar pollutant. Projects that prevent the generation of greenhouse gases earn these credits. This could be, for example, a project to swap coal-fired power stations with solar panels or hydro power. The resulting credits can be sold to businesses or individuals to offset the emissions they generate.

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Carbon standards

There are 2 types of Carbon Credits: Compliance and Voluntary. The Compliance Carbon Market relates to government-regulated programmes, such as the Kyoto Protocol, that require countries and large industries to reduce their emissions. The second is the Voluntary Carbon Market which covers carbon offset trading that is not required by government regulation. This market serves individuals, businesses, and organisations that chose to voluntarily take responsibility for their climate impact.

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The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)

The CDM was developed as a carbon standard in 1997 following the ratification of the Kyoto Protocol. Credits – or Certified Emissions Reductions (CERs) - are generated through emissions reduction projects in the developing world and are largely used by countries with Kyoto emissions caps to meet their targets.


Projects are qualified through a rigorous, public registration and issuance process which ensures emissions reductions are real, measurable, verifiable and additional to a ‘business as usual’ scenario.


Carbon credits (CERs) from CDM projects are a tradable commodity, with a floating market price.

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Gold Standard (GS)

The Gold Standard Foundation is a non-profit organisation which operates a carbon standard certification scheme for both Kyoto based CDM and Voluntary market credits. The Gold Standard trademark represents premium quality carbon credits which have actively contributed to sustainable development.


Only renewable energy and end-use efficiency projects can register for Gold Standard and all certified credits have undergone rigorous third party validation and verification. All approved projects must be registered in the Gold Standard online registry, ensuring a transparent chain of custody, from issuance through to retirement.

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The Verified Carbon Standard (VCS)

The VCS is a robust, global standard for voluntary carbon offset projects. Formerly known as The Voluntary Carbon Standard, it was founded in 2006 by The Climate Group, the International Emissions Trading Association, the World Economic Forum and later joined by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development.


The VCS programme ensures all carbon credits are real, measurable, additional, permanent, independently verified, unique and traceable. All approved projects are registered in the VCS’ online registry, ensuring a transparent chain of custody, from issuance through to retirement. In November 2008, the standard integrated guidelines on Agriculture, Forestry and other land-use (AFOLU) projects.

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